Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.561731
Title: Practical structured parallelism using BMF
Author: Crooke, David
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 1998
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Abstract:
This thesis concerns the use of the Bird- Meertens Formalism as a mechanism to control parallelism in an imperative programming language. One of the main reasons for the failure of parallelism to enter mainstream computing is the difficulty of developing software and the lack of the portability and performance predictability enjoyed by sequential systems. A key objetive should be to minimise costs by abstracting much of the complexity away from the programmer. Criteria for a suitable parallel programming paradigm to meet this goal are defined. The Bird-Meertens Formalism, which has in the past been shown to be a suitable vehicle for expressing parallel algorithms, is used as the basis for a proposed imperative parallel programming paradigm which meets these criteria. A programming language is proposed which is an example of this paradigm, based on the BMF Theory of Lists and the sequential language C. A concurrent operational semantics is outlined, with the emphasis on its use as a practical tool for imcreasing confidence in program correctness, rather than on full and rigorous formality. A prototype implementation of a subset of this language for a distributed memory, massively parallel computer is produced in the form of a C subroutine library. Although not offering realistic absolute performance, it permits measurements of scalability and relative performance to be undertaken. A case study is undertaken which implements a simple but realistic algoritm in the language, and considers how well the the criteria outlined at the start of the project are met. The prototype library implementation is used for performance measurements. A range of further possibilities is examinedm, in particular ways in which the paradigm language may be extended, and the possibility of using alternative BMF-like type theories. Pragmatic considerations for achieving performance in a production implementation are discussed.
Supervisor: Candlin, Rosemary. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.561731  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Bird-Meertens Formalism ; Parallel computing
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