Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.559465
Title: Prevalence of retained primitive reflexes in patients with anxiety disorders
Author: Forrest, Diane S.
Awarding Body: University of Edinburgh
Current Institution: University of Edinburgh
Date of Award: 2002
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Abstract:
Anxiety is not only one of the mental health disorders most commonly referred to clinicians, but is also a research interest, producing subsequent modification in treatment approaches. However, there are suggestions in the literature that the effectiveness of some psychological treatments have not been systematically evaluated (Department of Health, 2001), or that treatment studies have employed methods unrepresentative of everyday clinical practice (World Health Organization.2000). Furthermore, from analysis of outcome studies, psychological therapies have been reported as effective for only half of those treated (Fisher & Durham, 1999). These findings suggest that there are individuals with anxiety who fail to respond to available therapies, and that alternative approaches for this group are not well studied. Anxiety is not only one of the mental health disorders most commonly referred to clinicians, but is also a research interest, producing subsequent modification in treatment approaches. However, there are suggestions in the literature that the effectiveness of some psychological treatments have not been systematically evaluated (Department of Health, 2001), or that treatment studies have employed methods unrepresentative of everyday clinical practice (World Health Organization.2000). Furthermore, from analysis of outcome studies, psychological therapies have been reported as effective for only half of those treated (Fisher & Durham, 1999). These findings suggest that there are individuals with anxiety who fail to respond to available therapies, and that alternative approaches for this group are not well studied. tests employed in the study. From analysis of all individual test scores, two of these, detecting involvement of labyrinthine processes, resulted in the highest scores. The findings from analysis of resulting data are discussed in relation to implications for future study and further use of the measures with differing populations.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.559465  DOI: Not available
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