Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.557938
Title: A grounded theory approach to explore how women with Type 1 diabetes manage their diabetes during the menopausal transition
Author: Mackay, Liz
ISNI:       0000 0004 1917 7009
Awarding Body: Edinburgh Napier University
Current Institution: Edinburgh Napier University
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Aim To explore the experiences of women with Type 1 diabetes during the menopausal transition using a grounded theory approach and, from the data, develop a substantive theory that will have potential implications for service users and service providers. Methods A qualitative exploratory research framework was employed using grounded theory as an approach. Data were collected from 10 participants using transcribed audio-taped semi-structured interviews and field notes. The transcripts, audio recordings and field notes were reviewed and a coding process facilitated data analysis. Results A wide range of conceptions was revealed. Data are presented in seven categories that reflect the experience of the menopausal transition for women with Type 1 diabetes: ‘Blank wall' (relates to the lack of information regarding menopause and diabetes), ‘Juggling game' (relates to glycaemic control), Anxiety and fear, Self-management, ‘Haywire' (relates to the signs and symptoms of menopausal transition), Treating symptoms, Depression and mood, ‘I'm old' (relates to aging and mortality). Conclusion What emerged from the study is a substantive theory in which absence of information regarding the menopause and its impact on Type 1 diabetes (blank wall) was identified as the main problem facing women with Type 1 diabetes during their menopausal transition. The findings may enable practitioners to identify the types of information, advice and support that should be made available to these women and contributes to the limited knowledge base currently available. The findings indicate also that further research into this under-studied but important area of diabetes care is required.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: other Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.557938  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RT Nursing
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