Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.556797
Title: The utility of qualitative approaches in the investigation of the relationship between substance misuse and crime
Author: Shillam, Ann Margaret
Awarding Body: University of Birmingham
Current Institution: University of Birmingham
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
The aim of this thesis was to examine the relationship between substance misuse and crime. Whilst extensive research exists in this area, there remains a paucity of research utilising qualitative methodology. A narrative review demonstrates the complex nature of the drug/crime relationship and provides an argument for the use of narrative in examining the aetiology of a complex relationship. This relationship is further examined in Chapter 3, where Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse the narratives of 6 participants. The use of substances contributed to various types of offences for these participants as well as being apparent in the literature appertaining to sexual offending. Chapter 4 examines an intervention conducted with an alcoholic sex offender in treatment at a community drug and alcohol service. The intervention described enabled the client to identify pertinent risk factors (i.e. alcohol misuse) of recidivism without relinquishing his stance of ‘categorical denial’. A critique of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory 3 (SASSI-3) is provided in Chapter 5. Examination of psychometric properties suggests that the SASSI-3’s validity is questionable raising concern regarding its appropriate application. The author concludes that this thesis will enhance current understanding of the relationship between substance misuse and crime.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Foren.Psy.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.556797  DOI: Not available
Keywords: BF Psychology
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