Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.556721
Title: Developing synthetic tools for the study of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions
Author: García, Christian Arturo Fernández
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCIs) have been shown to be an important interaction in molecular recognition. These interactions present characteristics such as the synergistic effect with other interactions e.g. protein-protein interactions, specificity, polyvalency and in some cases requirement of divalent cations. CCIs remain insufficiently documented due to the weakness of such an interaction, which is difficult to probe by classical techniques and study at the molecular level in a monovalent system has not been performed. In order to study the CCI, a peptide based on alanine and lysine has been designed. Carbohydrates have been ligated to this peptide and changes in a-helix and random coil conformations are examined using CD spectroscopy. This system was shown to function as a reporter for CCls through changes in the conformations of the peptide. A second system that will be employed to study eCls is utilising the thiol-thioester exchange reaction. This involves a reaction between a carbohydrate with a thioester linkage and a carbohydrate linked to a thiol moiety. The resulting equilibrium is to be probed using HPLC. Synthetic routes have been developed in order to obtain the desired thiols and thioester. First studies showed that a CHO-π interaction can be quantified using this system. The carbohydrates to be attached are: Lex, sLex, LeY. The synthesis of Lex has been improved within the Gallagher group. A new synthesis of LeY was performed using an armed/disarmed strategy. Meanwhile, studies towards the synthesis of sLex were carried out.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.556721  DOI: Not available
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