Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.556153
Title: An exploration of parenting for those with an acquired brain injury (ABI)
Author: Edwards, Adrian Richard
Awarding Body: Oxford University
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
For individuals with an acquired brain injury (ABI) who have dependent children their ABI has the potential to impact upon their parenting abilities, skills and relationships. Parenting capacity is an important clinical issue supported by a wide body of existing literature and arises in many specialties, such as adult mental health, learning disabilities and forensics. In the field of ABI the issue of parenting capacity is less developed, yet it remains an important clinical issue. This systematic review examined the current state of knowledge about this within the ABI field and discovered the literature is, as yet, under developed, with little theory and no clear practice guidelines specific to brain-injured parents. Recommendations are made for the development of a parenting capacity assessment protocol for brain-injured parents. Additionally little research has been conducted to explore the effect ABI has on parenting. This empirical study aimed to qualitatively explore the experiences and needs of parents who have suffered an ABI in the last two years from their own perspectives. Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to analyse the data, leading to the identification of 4 main themes: (1) Multiple Losses, (2) A mix of resigned acceptance and uncertain future (3) Giving and receiving support is part of the healing process, (4) Hopes and aspirations. The results supported the idea of a circular, bi-directional, 'pendulum like' process of movement between experiencing the multiple losses of their parental role and attempting to adapt and adjust to these changes. The clinical and research implications of the systematic review and empirical paper are discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.556153  DOI: Not available
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