Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.555801
Title: Parental perceptions of child safety and unintentional injuries that occur within the home environment : a qualitative study
Author: Ablewhite, Joanne
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
Childhood unintentional injury is a leading cause of death and disability in the UK and shows steep social gradients. Few qualitative studies have explored potential explanations for the inequality amongst parents living in advantaged and disadvantaged areas. This thesis aims to generate potential explanations by: • Exploring differences in perceptions of child injury risk between parents living in advantaged and disadvantaged areas, • assessing differences in safety practices including parental supervision, between parents living in advantaged and disadvantaged areas, and • gaining an understanding of parental perceptions of, and possible barriers to implementing safety information and advice. Data was collected by qualitative face to face interviews with 21 parents in an advantaged area and 16 parents in a disadvantaged area. Original contributions to existing literature have been made as follows: • Mothers living in the disadvantaged area are not less aware of child home injury risks. • Some parents perceive the risk of child injury based on their own experiences with their child rather than on general safety awareness. • Parents make a distinction between 'acceptable' and 'unacceptable' unintentional injuries and do not seek to prevent 'acceptable' injuries. • Parents use listening and watching as a supervision strategy differently for boys and girls. • Parents living in the advantaged area described older children as an injury risk to younger siblings. Parents living in the disadvantaged area described older children as supervisors of younger siblings. • Parents living in the disadvantaged area describe less control over, and face greater barriers to adapting their homes. • Parents living in the disadvantaged area fear talking to professionals due to the potential consequences. Explanations for unintentional injury are related to the broader cumulative effects of socio-economic disadvantage. Parents living in disadvantaged areas face greater challenges in keeping their children safe from injury.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.555801  DOI: Not available
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