Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.555685
Title: Wehrmacht Health and Medical Services during the Italian campaign, 1943-1944 : an Army-level Study
Author: Flucker, Alexandria Kerr
Awarding Body: Glasgow Caledonian University
Current Institution: Glasgow Caledonian University
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
This thesis examines the performance of the Wehrmacht's medical service during the Second World War via a case study of the German Tenth Army. Earlier histories of the Wehrmacht and its medical service drew a distinct line between 'bad' Nazis and 'good' Wehrmacht doctors. So, just as combatant officers were upheld as honourable, decent men, doing a gruelling job, medical officers were represented as the guardians of humanity in the worst of times. However, these myths have gradually been eroded due to an increasing awareness of both the medical profession's and the Wehrmacht's close relationship with National Socialism, and this led to the emergence of a more critical analysis. As the involvement and complicity of German doctors in all aspects of the Nazi regime has become apparent, focus has turned to the ways in which National Socialist ideology influenced the work of Wehrmacht doctors. This thesis focuses on the ways in which doctors responded to a variety of health challenges faced by Tenth Army troops during the first year of the Italian campaign. It examines their underlying motivations and takes into account the factors which may have influenced their decisions. As these issues are examined, this thesis demonstrates that Tenth Army medical officers were not mere Nazi automatons whose decisions were underpinned entirely by National Socialist ideology. Instead their responses were based primarily on pragmatism and influenced by their immediate environment and current experiences.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.555685  DOI: Not available
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