Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.555125
Title: A preliminary investigation into the association between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and oropharyngeal dysphagia, and its impact on health
Author: McPhee, Kelly
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Title: A preliminary investigation into the association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and oropharyngeal dysphagia, and its impact on health. Background: Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with COPD is under researched; with its contribution to exacerbations of the disease and impact on quality of life remaining elusive. Aim of Study: To investigate the extent and nature of oropharyngeal dysphagia by phase of COPD, and its impact on health. Objectives of the study: Three objectives investigated were • subject perception of symptoms and swallowing related quality of life between normal controls and COPD (stable and exacerbation phase) • prevalence of biomechanical dysphagia by phase of COPD (stable and exacerbation) • prevalence of altered respiratory-swallow pattern by phase of COPD (stable and exacerbation) Study Design: Prospective, repeated measures observational study design with a cross sectional control arm. Feasibility Testing was conducted for the three key components of the assessment process. Methods for Prospective Study: Normal controls (n=36) completed a validatedquestionnaire (SWAL-QOL). COPD subjects completed the SWAL-QOL, videofluoroscopy and respiratory assessment simultaneously during exacerbation phase of COPD (n==14); followed up during stable phase (n=t 0). Results: Descriptive and non parametric analysis revealed COPD subjects were more likely to: • perceive their swallowing ability lower than controls (p<0.01) with further deterioration during exacerbations (p=0.012) • perceive their quality of life lower than controls (p
Supervisor: Enderby, Pamela ; Marshall, Michelle ; Lawson, Roderick Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.555125  DOI: Not available
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