Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.554256
Title: Exploring the impact of 3 variables on the self-care of adults with type 1 diabetes : exploring the role of efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness on the self-care behaviours and HbA1c levels of adults with type 1 diabetes
Author: Matthews, Charlotte
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Objectives: Psychological theories have increasingly sought to explore the impact of patients' health beliefs and appraisals on their diabetes self-care management. However, limited research has previously explored these conceptualisations in adults with type 1 diabetes. The objective was therefore to investigate the constructs of self efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness and their impact on the self- care behaviours and HbAle levels of this population. The self efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977b) and uncertainty in illness theory (Mishel, 1990) were used as theoretical frameworks. Design: A cross-sectional design was utilised. It was hypothesised that self efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness would be both associated with and predictive of self-care. It was hypothesised that there would be differences in levels of these variables between those with optimal and sub-optimal HhAj, percentages. Method: The study recruited 77 adults with type 1 diabetes from two diabetes clinics. The levels of self efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness were measured using standardised questionnaires. Latest HbAle levels were retrieved from patients' clinical notes. Results: Levels of self efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness were found to be associated with self-care. The combination of the three variables was also predictive of self-care. However, mixed results were found when focusing on regimen-specific self-care behaviours. Differences in outcome expectancy scores were found between those with optimal and sub-optimal HbAle levels. Conclusions: The results highlight the complex nature of variables that impact upon the self-care behaviours of adults with type 1 diabetes. The combined effect of self efficacy, outcome expectancy and uncertainty in illness suggests that both patients' understanding of their condition, in addition to their beliefs about carrying out recommended self-care is crucial. These variables should therefore be addressed further within future research, with the aim of translating these findings to clinical practice.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.554256  DOI: Not available
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