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Title: Corporal punishment of children : a critical realist account of experiences from two primary schools in urban Tanzania
Author: Yoshida, Tamaki
Awarding Body: Institute of Education, University of London
Current Institution: UCL Institute of Education (IOE)
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Corporal punishment of children is widely accepted and often legally practised in many countries, reflecting a seeming contrast between the rights and status of adults and of children. More countries are now banning corporal punishment in schools, as advocated by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child in its regular reviews of countries' compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989), the most widely ratified human rights Convention. With difficulty, Tanzania is gradually moving towards the banning of corporal punishment of children in schools. This thesis explores the experiences of discipline and punishment in two urban primary schools in Oar es Salaam, Tanzania. Research methods include ethnographic observations, group sessions and interviews with children, teachers and parents. A critical review of social research methodologies reveals gaps in existing approaches and shows how dialectical critical realism can offer deeper understanding. The analysis aims to understand the ontology of pain, the morality of the corporal punishment of children in relation to human rights. The thesis analyses accounts of childhood and punishment, and the nature of changes and differences in reality that reside in the bodies in pain, in conjunction with reason-emotion and power. Particular concerns are: how critical realist ontology and epistemology can inform understanding of the body in pain; how children's and adults' experiences of pain are given different meanings; and how critical realism helps to justify the possibility of universal human rights intended to protect children from corporal punishment.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.552741  DOI: Not available
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