Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.551594
Title: An evaluation of the carbohydrate, insulin collaborative education (choice) programme for young people with type 1 diabetes
Author: Chaney, David
Awarding Body: University of Ulster
Current Institution: Ulster University
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the effectiveness of structured diabetes education for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Aims: A multi-centre pragmatic randomized controlled trial to determine whether structured education can be used to improve glycaemic control, perceived quality of life, perceived empowerment and self-management strategies of adolescents at 1, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Methods: Adolescents diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes for at least 1 year were recruited from 7 hospitals within Northern Ireland. Outcome measures included HbA 1 c, QoL, empowerment and self-management strategies. Data were analysed on an intention to treat basis using ANOVA models. Results: 136 adolescents were randomized, 68 to control group (CG), and 68 to structured education group (EG). There was no difference in HbA 1 c between groups post intervention despite the increased dietary freedom of the EG. Those within EG reported significantly higher perception of control (p ~ .005). Impact on quality of life was significantly reduced for the EG at months 1 and 3 post intervention (p ~ .05, P ~ .05). Those within the EG reported improved dietary adherence (p = .00) when compared to CG. Although those within the EG reported significantly increased empowerment from baseline (p ~ .01) this was not group dependant. Conclusions: This study found that structured education reduced the impact of diabetes on quality of life and increased dietary adherence. These effects reduced over time suggesting the need for further support post education.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.551594  DOI: Not available
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