Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.551352
Title: A comprehensive myth : marginalized regional approaches to immigration policy along the global Rio Grande
Author: Baradello, Frederico Carlos
Awarding Body: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Current Institution: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Influential immigrant-receiving country actors have long articulated the need for a comprehensive approach to immigration policy. However, even in the midst of immigration policy failure, immigrant receiving countries have tended to not implement comprehensive approaches. This thesis classifies comprehensive approaches into regional and unilateral approaches and asks: what factors explain immigrant receiving country marginalization of regional approaches to immigration policy with immigrant-sending countries? Three factors can explain immigrant-receiving country marginalization of regional approaches to immigration policy with immigrant-sending countries: political salience, interests and institutions. This thesis's explanatory model incorporates the political salience of immigration as the independent variable, interests and institutions as mediating variables, and the marginalization of regional approaches to immigration policy as the dependent variable. First, this thesis hypothesizes that during shifts from low to high political salience of immigration, immigrant-receiving countries exhibit a tendency to marginalize regional approaches to immigration policy. Second, the relative marginalization of regional approaches to immigration policy across liberal democratic immigrant-receiving countries can be explained by key constraints: (1) convergence in political, economic and legal interests held by influential immigrant-receiving and immigrant-sending country actors towards regional approaches to immigration policy; (2) insulation of immigrant-receiving country immigration agencies through internal constraints, including the immigrant-receiving country regime type; and (3) insulation of immigrant receiving country immigration agencies through external constraints, including bilateral and regional institutionalization. This thesis applies the Mexico-US and Morocco-Spain dyads to the explanatory model and explores their immigration policy experiences utilizing a process-tracing approach that considers political discourse and policy implementation stages of the public policy cycle. Ultimately, there is a relationship between the political salience of immigration and the marginalization of regional approaches to immigration policy. Interest and institution-based constraints help to explain why Spain did not marginalize regional approaches to immigration policy with Morocco to the same extent as the US with Mexico.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.551352  DOI: Not available
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