Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.551207
Title: Writing the body, writing the land : Barbour, Brandt, Webb, and Halfe
Author: Butler, Jenna
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
'Writing the Body, Writing the Land: Barbour, Brandt, Webb, and Halfe' examines the poetics and backgrounds of four western Canadian poets whom I find vastly influential in my own writing. Organized into four focal chapters, in addition to a full manuscript of poetry, this thesis sets out to examine, within each chapter, one of the four chosen poets' work and its specific influence upon my own writing, as evidenced by connections made to the poems from the creative manuscript 'Seldom Seen Road'. Starting with Douglas Barbour's work with the breath and with sound poetry, the thesis progresses through Di Brandt's ecopoetics and Phyllis Webb's obsession with voicing the silenced feminine through the landscape, and ends at Louise Bernice Halfe's focus upon writing across cultural boundaries. I have undertaken both explanatory and exploratory research in this thesis in the forging of connections between the focal poets' work and my own, and in researching poets whose work is not necessarily critically well known. For instance, although a portion of this thesis examines the work of poets who have already had some critical exposure, such as Brandt and Webb, other areas, such as the chapters on Barbour and Halfe, potentially represent some of the first major lengthy pieces of critical writing about these poets. The creative collection 'Seldom Seen Road' is my way of examining the influences of the four focal poets upon my own writing. I have carefully considered each poet's influence upon particular areas of my work (for instance, Webb's and Barbour's influence through the form of the anti ghazal) both prior to and during the writing process. This has resulted in a poetry manuscript that was formed in active consultation with the texts of the four focal writers and reveals my engagement with each of their distinct poetics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.551207  DOI: Not available
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