Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.551115
Title: Managing minority identities : the role of psychological therapy
Author: Kainth, Tony
Awarding Body: City University
Current Institution: City, University of London
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
This study explores South Asian British gay men's experiences of therapy. Salient literature in the fields of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) identities; ethnic identities; and psychotherapeutic theory and practice highlighted the need for continuing qualitative investigation into experiences of therapy. The paucity of research examining ethnic, sexual and multiple minority populations' experiences of therapy in the United Kingdom, coupled with queer theory's endeavours to deconstruct hegemonic discourses with a view to reconstructing fluid and ambiguous identity categories, deemed the current investigation pertinent. Eight self-identified gay British men of South Asian descent who had experienced psychological therapy were interviewed, using a semi-structured interview schedule. The interview data were then transcribed and were analysed utilising a constructivist grounded theory methodology. Two core categories, seven categories and 21 sub-categories were evident following analysis of the interview data. The core categories were 'Managing Multiple Identities' and 'Experiencing Therapy'. The role of context was also explored in relation to the core category 'Managing Multiple Identities'. The findings were then considered in relation to the existing relevant literature with reflections on the quality of the research and on clinical implications and future directions arising from the findings. Particular focus is given to identity process theory, queer theory and LGB affirmative therapy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.551115  DOI: Not available
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