Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.549524
Title: An exploration of the link between pupil motivation and disruptive behaviour in the classroom
Author: Ikeogu, Nneka
Awarding Body: Institute of Education, University of London
Current Institution: UCL Institute of Education (IOE)
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
The relevance of motivation to education and pupils' academic achievement has long been recognised, and research has indicated that the concept of motivation may also be reliably linked to pupils' behaviour in school. A key aim of the present study is to investigate the link between pupil motivation and disruptive behaviour in the classroom. In particular, the study will examine whether the combination of achievement goal theory and self-determination theory can provide a better explanation for pupils' disruptive behaviour in the classroom than either theory alone. A further aim of the research is to explore how aspects of classroom and school structures might impact on pupil motivation and behaviour. A mixed methods design was employed in service of the research questions. A sample of 257 pupils aged between 9 and 11 from four primary schools completed a questionnaire containing items related to their perceptions of their classroom goal structures, personal goal orientations, perceptions of teaching and liking for school. Pupils also reported on their engagement in disruptive behaviour in the classroom. Interviews were conducted with class teachers and a member of the senior management team in each school to elicit their views on school practices and processes that they believed to have an impact on pupil motivation and behaviour. Overall, the study found that the combination of achievement goal theory and selfdetermination theory provided a better explanation for pupils' engagement in disruptive behaviour, with pupils' perceptions of a classroom performance approach and liking for school being the most significant predictors of disruptive behaviour, along with gender. Class teachers reported the use of practices underpinned by aspects of both theories in their classrooms as a way of motivating pupils and promoting good behaviour. The enhancement of pupil motivation was generally considered as a priority and was featured in school policy documents. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of curriculum delivery in schools and the development of whole school practices which aim to encourage pupil motivation and promote positive behaviour.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.549524  DOI: Not available
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