Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.548878
Title: Informal carers of stroke survivors
Author: Legg, Lynn A.
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 2012
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Abstract:
In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing studies, conference proceedings and trials registers were searched, reference lists of relevant articles were scanned and researchers and authors in the field were contacted. Selection criteria: Studies were included if the focus was on; study participants as a provider of care to a stroke survivor living in the community, had no restrictions on admissible participants, had no restrictions on type of stroke patient, depression was measured using standard criteria and measures of occurrence of depression presented in a binary format (i.e., depressed/ not depressed). Types of epidemiologic study eligible included: cohort studies, case-control studies, including prevalent case-control studies and cross sectional studies, including prevalence studies. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors selected studies for inclusion, independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Estimates of pooled prevalence were calculated using inverse variance methods. Results: 19 studies were identified. 12 studies used a single cohort design and six studies used a cross sectional design. One study is ongoing and awaiting assessment. No cohort studies included a referent or comparator group of people who were unexposed to providing informal care. Data on prevalence of depression were available from 16 studies (1848 participants). No studies were identified that collected data on incidence of depression. No investigators reported including participants to cohort studies that were free of depression at the initial observation. The estimates of prevalence of depression are based on the number of people who scored above a clinical cut point on a self-report dimensional rating scale for depression. The overall pooled prevalence estimate calculated using the inverse variance method using a random effects model was slightly lower (28%, 95% CI 23%, 33%) than when the analysis was restricted to studies with an ideal design (30%, 95% CI 25%, 34%). The majority of studies lack a description of important characteristics that define the informal caregiver population. Lack of a clear and unambiguous operational definition of informal care is common across studies. Conclusions: Estimates of prevalence of depression in people who provide care to informal stroke survivors are similar to those observed in community studies of the prevalence of depression. There is currently insufficient evidence from epidemiological studies to suggest and association between the provision of informal care and the development of depression. Chapter 5 Non-pharmacological interventions for informal carers of stroke survivors. Synopsis of chapter 5. Chapter 5 focuses on the analysis and evaluation of the existing literature on the effects of non pharmacological interventions targeted towards people who provide informal care to stroke survivors. For presentation purposes, this chapter is divided into several sections. Section A describes the background and rationale for the systematic review. Section B describes the methods of the review including the types of participants, types of interventions, types of outcome and types of study, searching for studies, selecting studies and collecting data, assessing risk of bias in included studies, methods for analysing data and undertaking meta-analysis. Section C presents the meta-analysis of the relevant studies. The results are presented and discussed. Abstract. Background: A substantial component of care is provided to stroke survivors by informal caregivers. However, providing such care is often a new and challenging experience and has been linked to a number of adverse outcomes. A range of interventions targeted towards stroke survivors and their family or other informal caregivers have been tested in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Objectives: To evaluate the effect of interventions targeted towards informal caregivers of stroke survivors or targeted towards informal caregivers and the care recipient (the stroke survivor). Search methods: The Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched March 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2010); MEDLINE (1950 to August 2010), EMBASE (1980 to December 2010), CINAHL; (1982 to August 2010), AMED (1985 to August 2010), PsycINFO (1967 to August 2010) Science Citation Index (1992 to August 2010) and six other electronic databases were searched. In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing studies, conference proceedings and trials registers were searched, reference lists of relevant articles were scanned and researchers and authors in the field were contacted. Selection criteria RCTs were included if they evaluated the effect of non-pharmacological interventions (compared with no care or routine care) on informal caregivers of stroke survivors. Trials of interventions were included if they delivered to stroke survivors and informal caregivers only if the stroke survivor and informal caregiver were randomised as a dyad. Studies which included stroke survivors and caregivers were excluded if the stroke survivors were the primary target of the intervention. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors selected studies for inclusion, independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Original data was sought from trialists. Interventions were categorised into three groups: support and information, teaching procedural knowledge/vocational training type interventions, and psycho-educational type interventions. The primary outcome was caregivers' stress or strain. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Eight studies, including a total of 1007 participants, met the inclusion criteria. The results of all the studies were not pooled because of substantial methodological, statistical and clinical heterogeneity. For caregivers' stress or strain no significant results were found within categories of intervention, with the exception of one single-centre study examining the effects of a 'vocational training' type intervention which found a mean difference between the intervention and comparator group at the end of scheduled follow-up of -8.67 (95% confidence interval -11.30 to -6.04, P < 0.001) in favour of the 'teaching procedural knowledge' type intervention group Conclusions: It was not possible to carry out a meta-analysis of the evidence from RCTs because of methodological, clinical and statistical heterogeneity. One limitation across all studies was the lack of a description of important characteristics that define the informal caregiver population. However, 'vocational educational' type interventions delivered to caregivers prior to the stroke survivor's discharge from hospital appear to be the most promising intervention. However, this is based on the results from one, small, single-centre study. Chapter 6 Conclusions. Synopsis of Chapter 6. This chapter, after outlining the findings of the individual studies included in this thesis and how they fit into the broader literature, makes observations about the approach that has been taken and lessons learned, some with the benefit of hindsight, in order to inform future research work on informal carers. This chapter also examines the structure, purpose, limitations, use and misuse of the informal care epidemiological literature. The chapter finishes with recommendations for future research, clinical practice and policy.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.548878  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RZ Other systems of medicine
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