Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.548231
Title: The invisibility of being a new nurse : the experience of transition from student to registered children's nurse
Author: Farasat, Helen
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Southampton
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
This research examines the transition from student nurse to Registered Nurse (child). Earlier studies suggest the transition always involves a period of discomfort and uncertainty. However, there is a dearth of longitudinal studies of children‟s nurses, revealing a gap in the evidence that this study aims to fill. This longitudinal study commenced in one HEI in England where the six participants were completing their undergraduate programme in child nursing. A phenomenological interpretive design was used to answer the research question: „What is the experience of making the transition from student to RN (child) like?‟ Data was collected using focused qualitative interviews at three stages: mid final year, and at 3–4 months and 12–14 months post-employment as an RN. The data was analysed using descriptive and interpretive methods. The thesis draws out the changes in the participants experience over time and suggests the transition extends beyond the first year of practice. It involves development within four overarching themes: Personal and Professional Identity, Primacy of Practice, Working with People, and Managing Newness. These key themes are present across the participants‟ experience but their importance changes over time. The transition is characterised by the visibility of being a nurse and the invisibility of being a „new‟ nurse. This study supports the findings of some earlier studies and introduces some new evidence in relation to children‟s nursing, such as responding to crises, coping with grief and the difficulties and challenges of working with parents. The main limitations are that this is a small-scale study within a specific branch of nursing, with participants drawn from one HEI and conducted by a single investigator. However, because the participants took up employment in different locations in England, the findings may have some resonance with other neophyte children‟s nurses beyond the original setting of the research. Recommendations are made for undergraduate programme providers and employers to strengthen and develop the preparation of RN (child) pre- and post-qualification, particularly in the areas of preceptorship, prioritising care and managing time, working with parents, and coping with emergencies or the death of a child
Supervisor: Seale, Jane K. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.548231  DOI: Not available
Keywords: LB2300 Higher Education ; RT Nursing
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