Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.545572
Title: An investigation into transfer provision for children and young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (Paper 1) ; The effects of school transfer for children and young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, focussing on positive and negative emotions reported by parents, schools and pupils (Paper 2)
Author: King, Stephanie
Awarding Body: University of Exeter
Current Institution: University of Exeter
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Paper 1: This study represents the wider perspective of a 2-stage study about school transfers, for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders. The study used a mixed methodology to investigate the experiences of children moving schools, as reported by parents and schools. Pre-move general satisfaction and post-move success ratings were high. Transfer arrangements varied greatly. Many respondents despite being positive overall about the move reported difficulties and frustrations for themselves and the children making the move. Communication between all stakeholders was seen to be a main factor in improving transfers, with an emphasis on the Teaching Assistant role and a whole school ethos towards ASD. Although strategies and guidance are widely available to improve transfer for children, not all pupils with ASDs and their parents, had access to the same level of enhanced transfer arrangements within the county. Paper 2: This paper represents the more focussed perspective of a 2- stage study about school transfers, for children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, in mainstream education. The study used a mixed methodology to investigate the experiences of children moving schools, as reported by parents and schools, with all participants, and via child interviews with a smaller sample. School transfer (as part of a 2- or 3-tier education system) was identified as a time which can be especially challenging for children with ASDs in mainstream schools. Looking at the emotional effects of transfer, the study found parents and schools reported high levels of increased anxiety among transferring children with ASDs. Qualitative analysis identified a wide variety of triggers to anxiety, and strategies to reduce anxiety that are being used in school and at home. Positive emotions expressed about the move were also explored. This anxiety reduced post-move for some of the children, but was maintained for some. Parents perceived higher levels of anxiety in their children than schools did throughout the transfer period, despite many rating the move as successful overall. The experience of a school move was found to be a time parents, as well as children, need the information and reassurance of a well-planned transfer, with appropriate strategies in place for their child and effective, open communication between home and schools to reduce the negative emotions that can surround change for children with ASDs, and celebrate the positive.
Supervisor: Norwich, Brahm Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Ed.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.545572  DOI: Not available
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