Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.545215
Title: Study of the cholinergic factors affecting the flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potentials
Author: Padhiar, Sanjita
ISNI:       0000 0001 3462 7862
Awarding Body: University of Aston in Birmingham
Current Institution: Aston University
Date of Award: 1993
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Abstract:
The effects of cholinergic agents undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and the anticholinergic agent scopolamine, were investigated on the components of the flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in young healthy volunteers. The effect of recording the flash and pattern reversal VEPs for 13 hours in 5 healthy male volunteers, revealed no statistically significant change in the latency or amplitude measures. Administration of the muscarinic agonist SDZ 210-086 to 16 healthy male volunteers resulted in the reduction of the flash N2-P2 and pattern reversal N75-P100 peak-to-peak amplitudes. These effects on the flash VEP occurred at both doses (0.5 and 1.0 mg/day), but only at the higher dose on the pattern reversal VEP. Administration of the antimuscarinic agent scopolamine to 11 healthy young male volunteers, resulted in a delay of the flash P2 latency but no effect on the pattern reversal P100 latency. The pattern reversal N75-P100 peak-to-peak amplitude was also increased post dosing. The combination of scopolamine with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor SDZ ENA 713 resulted in no significant effect on the flash and pattern reversal VEPs, suggesting that the effects of scopolamine may have been partially reversed. Topical application of scopolamine in 6 young healthy volunteers also resulted in no statistically significant effects on the flash and pattern reversal VEPs. The selective effect of scopolamine on the flash P2 latency but not on the pattern reversal P100 latency, provided a model whereby new cholinergic agents developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease can be investigated on a physiological basis. In addition, the results of this study led to the hypothesis that the selective flash P2 delay in Alzheimer's disease was probably due to a cholinergic deficit in both the tectal pathway from the retina to the visual cortex and the magnocellular path of the geniculostriate pathway, whereas the lack of an effect on the pattern reversal P100 component was probably due to a sparing of the parvocellular geniculostriate pathway.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.545215  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Optometry
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