Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.543371
Title: The Taiwanese Bank Employee's personality stereotype : an exploration of its predictive power on organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit
Author: Cheng, Jen-Li
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2011
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Abstract:
There has been much research in western cultures about job-related personality stereotypes and about the relationships among personality, demographic characteristics, organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit. However, there is a paucity of such studies based on eastern cultures. This research addresses such omissions. Having identified, and in cases devised, valid and reliable personality, organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit measures suitable for use with a Taiwanese population, this research identifies if there is personality stereotype for Taiwanese bank employees and explores the relationships among Taiwanese bank employees' personality, demographic characteristics, organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit Eighteen hundred personality questionnaires (CPAI-2; Cheung et al., 2001) were distributed to employees in three banks in Taiwan. A total of 847 questionnaires were returned and the data analysed using SPSS. Comparing the means generated for each of the 28 scales of the CPAI-2 with secondary data from a general population study by Cheung et al. (2004), show male and female Taiwanese bank employees possess a stereotypical personality. Significant differences were found in the scales of all four personality factors of the CPAI-2 (Cheung et al., (2001) - Social Potency, Accommodation, Dependability, and Interpersonal Relatedness) for both male and female bank employees A further study of Taiwanese bank employees (N=388) found a total of 70 significant relationships (30 for males and 40 for females) among the 28 personality scales, affective, continuanceperson-organisation fit. Indeed, seven personality scales were found to significantly predict organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit for male and 14 for female Taiwanese bank employees. Only three personality scales were significant predictors for both males and females but did not predicted the same outcome for both genders. Overall, the amount of variance accounted for by personality for both males and females was low. Adding demographic characteristics into the regression only marginally increased the amount of variance accounted for. Reflecting upon analyses of each bank's history, nature of business, and interviews with salient managers in each bank (3 in Chang Hwa, 2 in TaiShin, and 1 in SinoPac), the data were re-analysed by each individual bank to address each bank's unique organisational culture. The results show increases in the amounts of variance accounted for by personality and demographic characteristics in 18 out of 30 possibilities but there is no similar pattern of results for either males or females or indeed across each of the three banks. For example, in the SinoPac bank male employees' affective commitment increases to 43% from 19.1%, continuance commitment to 41.9% from 11.1%, normative commitment to 23.1 % from 3.3%, job satisfaction to 38.6% from 20.6%, but not person-organisation fit. Such effects, however, are not found for the SinoPac bank's female employees where the amounts of variance accounted for all decreased, except for person organisation fit, which increased from 8.2% to 19.8% The research findings are discussed and psychometric recommendations are made for each bank's recruitment and retention strategies. The research's limitations and suggestions for further research are also made, and normative commitment, job satisfaction, andperson-organisation fit. Indeed, seven personality scales were found to significantly predict organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and person-organisation fit for male and 14 for female Taiwanese bank employees. Only three personality scales were significant predictors for both males and females but did not predicted the same outcome for both genders. Overall, the amount of variance accounted for by personality for both males and females was low. Adding demographic characteristics into the regression only marginally increased the amount of variance accounted for. Reflecting upon analyses of each bank's history, nature of business, and interviews with salient managers in each bank (3 in Chang Hwa, 2 in TaiShin, and 1 in SinoPac), the data were re-analysed by each individual bank to address each bank's unique organisational culture. The results show increases in the amounts of variance accounted for by personality and demographic characteristics in 18 out of 30 possibilities but there is no similar pattern of results for either males or females or indeed across each of the three banks. For example, in the SinoPac bank male employees' affective commitment increases to 43% from 19.1%, continuance commitment to 41.9% from 11.1%, normative commitment to 23.1 % from 3.3%, job satisfaction to 38.6% from 20.6%, but not person-organisation fit. Such effects, however, are not found for the SinoPac bank's female employees where the amounts of variance accounted for all decreased, except for person organisation fit, which increased from 8.2% to 19.8% The research findings are discussed and psychometric recommendations are made for each bank's recruitment and retention strategies. The research's limitations and suggestions for further research are also made.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.543371  DOI: Not available
Share: