Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.542311
Title: Black and minority ethnic men's perceptions of Clinical Psychology as a career : a qualitative study exploring levels of career attractiveness and factors that propose a barrier for entry to the profession
Author: Marinho, Gisele
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of BME men about clinical psychology as a profession. BME groups and men are underrepresented as clinical psychologists and some research exists that provide some explanations for this. These studies seem to focus strongly on the factors associated with the BME groups and have not focused specifically on BME men. The objective of this study was therefore to begin developing an understanding about the factors that stop BME men entering the profession with a particular focus on the factors related to the discipline. A constructionist grounded theory methodology was adopted to analyse the interviews of five men from Black African and Caribbean backgrounds and the grounded theory model 'Underrepresentation of BME men in clinical psychology' was developed. It comprises three categories as understood by the researcher - 'Societal factors (Stereotypes & Inequalities)', 'Clinical psychology factors' and 'Aspects of BME male experience' - which cumulatively lead to low numbers of Black African and Caribbean men as clinical psychologists. The resulting model emphasises the responsibility of clinical psychology in addressing the Underrepresentation of this group within the profession, by addressing its low visibility at degree and pre-degree level, the eurocentricity of its staff composition and theoretical basis and its role at a wider level to address stereotypes and inequality. Further research could expand on the model by exploring the perceptions about the profession with a more diverse and wider sample of BME men at degree and pre-degree level.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.542311  DOI: Not available
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