Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.540000
Title: Investigation of views on breast cancer among Chinese women in the UK
Author: Shang, Chenyu
Awarding Body: University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2011
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Abstract:
Breast cancer is increasingly threatening the health of Chinese women. However, little is known about beliefs, attitudes or health practice related to breast cancer among Chinese women in the UK, which means that it is difficult for health professionals to provide evidence-based services to them. Using a triangulation research design, this study investigated the views on breast cancer among Chinese women in the UK. Moreover, factors influencing their views and the factors potentially threatening Chinese women's breast health were also examined. Chinese women who accessed the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK for primary care and were aged from 50 to 70 years were targeted. Twenty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted initially. Based on interview findings, a questionnaire was developed and a questionnaire-based survey was undertaken in a larger population. The findings showed that although negative views on breast cancer were held by the majority of the Chinese women, most women engaged in a healthy lifestyle and actively attended breast screening in order to promote health and prevent breast cancer. Breast cancer views were significantly influenced by the extent to which these Chinese women had been in contact with western culture. Chinese women who were more acculturated to western culture were more likely to hold positive views on breast cancer. Two factors potentially threatened Chinese women's breast health, which were lack of knowledge on breast and barriers to accessing health services. In order to promote early detection, practice nurses in communities need to develop culturally sensitive educational intervention to improve Chinese women's knowledge on breast cancer, in particular on warning signs and risk factors. In addition, barriers to accessing health services need to be tackled. In particular, interpretation services should be provided to those with limited English proficiency.
Supervisor: Campbell, Malcolm ; Willard, Carole ; Beaver, Kinta Sponsor: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.540000  DOI: Not available
Keywords: breast cancer ; Chinese women ; beliefs
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