Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.538314
Title: Exploring integral transformative education for actors
Author: Edinborough, Alastair Campbell
Awarding Body: Royal Holloway, University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
The aim of the thesis is to examine certain potential problems in the field of actor training, and to explore and devise means of addressing these problems. The fundamental problem addressed notes that certain forms of training, specifically training with the primary goal of teaching executive functions or skills, can lead to the creation of undifferentiated, compulsive behaviours in the student. The thesis notes that some skills-led approaches to actor training might not provide the actor with a differentiated understanding of the functional uses for the skills that they teach, or the teacher's justification for teaching such skills. In such approaches the actor is not free to understand and value his/her skills in relation to his/her own needs as an actor. Through analysing the work of the educational philosopher John Dewey, as well as paradigms of human learning presented by Ken Wilber, Lawrence Kohlberg and Abraham Maslow, the thesis notes that in order to avoid problems associated with teaching methods that forge compulsive behaviours, a successful actor-training must take into account the transformative effects trainings have on the structure of the actor's self. In order to facilitate training as an integrated, transformative process of self development the thesis utilises Ken Wilber's Integral Four Quadrant system of analysis as a means to study the fields in which an actor can develop his/her self, before examining an approach to transformative actor-training that focuses on the question of how the actor can embody his/her presence in the model of theatre as a communicative encounter (notably analysed by Victor Turner). The thesis makes reference to a number of educational processes that facilitate the learning of `presence' as an integrated process of self-development, but specifically focuses on the teaching and learning of mindfulness meditation, the Feldenkrais Method, and the martial art of Aikido.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.538314  DOI: Not available
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