Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.537552
Title: Feminist and lesbian strategies of reading and the novels of Sarah Waters and Jeanette Winterson
Author: Luis, Chiara
Awarding Body: University of Salford
Current Institution: University of Salford
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
This thesis examines strategies of feminist and lesbian reading in relation to the novels of Sarah Waters and Jeanette Winterson, focusing primarily on Waters's Affinity (1999) and The Night Watch (2006), and Winterson's Sexing the Cherry (1989), Written on the Body (1992), and The PowerBook (2000). Three strategies of reading reading as romance, reading as quest and reading as revision are developed and explored, one in each chapter, in an effort to address the overarching question of this thesis: how do we read as feminists and/or lesbians? This question generates two subsequent research questions which frame the readings of Waters's and Winterson's novels offered in the individual chapters of this thesis. In the case of Winterson's fiction and particularly in Chapter Two, this question is, how useful is it to continue to read Winterson as a "lesbian writer?" In the case of Waters's fiction and particularly in Chapter Three, this question is, is Waters's project really to write the lesbian back into history? Together, these questions reflect a more general research question which draws together the fiction of Waters and Winterson by asking, how can readings of both writers' work move beyond the expectations placed on the "lesbian author"? This thesis contributes original research to the field of contemporary women's writing by advancing new ideas and arguments which aim to widen the contexts in which the fiction of these two authors is read. In the case of Winterson's fiction, an original reading is presented which establishes the significance of her fiction to a literary tradition of narrative romance. In the case of Waters's fiction, an original reading is presented which establishes the revisionary project of her fiction as a concern to enable the reading of history from a lesbian reading position.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.537552  DOI: Not available
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