Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.535739
Title: A model for the creation and operation of an integrated childrens services team : can collaborative inquiry be used as a tool to facilitate the professional acceptability of organisational change?
Author: Johnson, Nick
Awarding Body: Institute of Education, University of London
Current Institution: UCL Institute of Education (IOE)
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The Children Act of 2004 sets down a new challenge for the professionals responsible for child welfare. Because the inter-professional collaboration between educationalists, social workers and health workers is perceived to have significant weaknesses, these professionals are now being required to undergo a process of role integration - the formation of a new cohesive team around the needs of the child. Nevertheless, the literature suggests that such change cannot be imposed by statutory regulation or managerial action but should be introduced by professionals themselves through a process of informed professional judgement. The professional acceptability of such organisational change is also dependent on the methods and techniques used to change professionality. Using collaborative inquiry as a tool, this study traces the work of a multidisciplinary group of professionals (a champion group) as it reviews current practices. This enables the group to recommend a new structure for an integrated service team to replace current separate agency accountability. It also identifies professional attitudes towards this new way of working. Finally, based on these findings, the study summarises a potential model for the introduction and implementation of an integrated service that may be of value in similar work settings.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.535739  DOI: Not available
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