Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.532965
Title: Rethinking rehabilitation : the lived-experience of service users in mental health rehabilitation services
Author: Riddington, Megan
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Introduction: Community-based mental health rehabilitation is increasingly viewed as occupying a central position within the spectrum of care available to people with 'severe mental illness' (DH, 1999, pp.5). The definitions of rehabilitation informing this care primarily originate from service providers; service user understandings and experiences of rehabilitation have been inadequately explored, and the relationship between it and the potentially related concept of 'recovery' has not been examined. This study begins to address these issues by exploring the lived-experience in mental heath rehabilitation services, with specific attention to understandings and experience of rehabilitation. In doing so, it seeks to promote a fuller understanding of rehabilitation, benefiting the development and delivery of services, whilst providing a foundation from which the desirability of a unified definition of rehabilitation can be considered. Method: Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews were undertaken with eight participants (seven men and one woman) recruited from 24-hour nurse-supported community mental health rehabilitation provisions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (Smith & Osborn, 2003). Results: Analysis yielded the three master themes of (i) 'Positioning of Power'; (ii) 'Moving Forward' and (iii) 'A Conducive Setting'. Within these themes respectively, the six subordinate themes of (i) 'Control' and 'Meeting Standards', (ii) 'Being Involved in a Process' and 'Independence through Skills' and (iii) 'Relationships, Re-engagement and Togetherness' and 'Nurturing Environment' were identified. Discussion: The analysis is discussed in relation to the extant literature base, with particular focus on relationships, power, independence, and moving on through services. Implications are identified and recommendations for clinical practice and research are considered. Critical review: The study is reviewed with specific attention to its limitations, quality and control, and the impact of researcher factors on the research process.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psych.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.532965  DOI: Not available
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