Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.532938
Title: Investigating the efficacy of a short-term cognitive behavioural intervention in reducing anger related difficulties and promoting peer acceptance for children and an exploration of the relationship between their social status and behaviourial characteris
Author: Dosani, Sima
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a six-week cognitive behavioural intervention in reducing anger and enhancing peer acceptance for a group of children, whilst also exploring the relationship between their behavioural characteristics and social status. The research was part of a larger project involving the researcher and two other Trainee Educational Psychologists (TEPs). A total of sixty-nine participants aged between 7 to 11 years were selected for this study using teacher nominations. These children were recruited from twelve primary schools across a large county within the south of England. Thirty-five of these participants were assigned to the experimental group and thirty-four of these participants were assigned to the wait-list control group. Teacher ratings showed that the intervention was effective in reducing anger for the wait-list control group but not for the experimental group. Participant ratings from both the experimental and wait-list control groups showed that the intervention was effective in enhancing participants' awareness of the number of physiological symptoms associated with their anger and the range of strategiest hat they could use to diffuse their anger.T he interventionw as not effective in enhancingp eer acceptances coresf or either the experimentalo r wait-list control groups. Finally, the analysis determined that the participants who were perceived by their peers as being highly cooperative and/or having good leadership qualities were accepted by their peers. In contrast, participants who were perceived by their peers as being highly disruptive, unhappy and/or a bully were rejected by their peers. This indicated that peer valued behavioural characteristicsc ould moderatet he relationshipb etweena ngera nd peerr ejection. The theoretical underpinnings, relevant literature and findings from this research will be discussed in relation to implications for professional practice and future recommendations
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Doctorate of Educational and Child Psychology Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.532938  DOI: Not available
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