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Title: Transgenerational transmission of subjugation schema, attachment style and assertiveness between mothers and daughters who were physically abused in childhood
Author: Rees, Melinda
Awarding Body: University of East London
Current Institution: University of East London
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The study set out to investigate the similarities and differences between mothers and their adult daughters with regard to depression and anxiety, subjugation schema, attachment style and assertiveness, given the presence or absence of childhood physical abuse. In addition, the research explored whether mother's abuse status would be related to daughter's subjugation schema, attachment style and assertiveness, regardless of daughter's own abuse status. Finally, the study examined whether mother's abuse status was related to their ability to accurately predict daughter'S subjugation schema. Thirty pairs of inner-city mothers and daughters, from a community-based sample were recruited. In Group 1, both mothers and daughters had been abused. In Group 2, mothers had been abused but daughters had not. In Group 3, neither mothers nor daughters had been abused. Questionnaire measures of depression and anxiety, subjugation schema, attachment style and assertiveness were collected. In addition, thirty mothers in the sample were also interviewed in depth for attachment style and their predictions of their daughter's subjugation schema. Abused members of the sample were more likely to be depressed and anxious than not. Moreover, non-abused daughters were significantly far more likely not to subjugate their needs. Mothers were significantly more likely to have a non-standard attachment style if they had been abused in childhood. There were no clear results for assertiveness with abuse status in either mothers or daughters. There was a trend at the 10% level of significance, for abused daughters of abused mothers to be more subjugating than non-abused daughters. Similarly, daughters who had been subject to two generations of abuse, their own and their mother's, were more likely to have non-standard attachment styles than non-abused daughters. Mother's abuse status was not significantly related to assertiveness. In conclusion, there was limited evidence to suggest the intergenerational transmission of subjugation schema and non-standard attachment from abused mothers to their daughters. Lastly, it was found that non-subjugating daughters were likely to be accurately appraised by their mothers, whilst mothers who had been physically abused in childhood were significantly more likely to be inaccurate in their predictions of their daughter's subjugation schema. The study requires replication with a larger sample.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.532478  DOI: Not available
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