Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.529629
Title: The effect of surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on the coagulation system
Author: Franks, Sarah Caroline
Awarding Body: University of Leicester
Current Institution: University of Leicester
Date of Award: 2010
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
Normal anatomy of the abdominal aorta The abdominal aorta commences as the descending thoracic aorta and pierces the diaphragm at the lower border of the body of the 12th thoracic vertebra (the diaphragmatic hiatus). The aorta then descends in the retroperitoneal space anterior to the vertebral bodies and just to the left of the midline until it reaches the body of the 4th lumbar vertebra. Here it divides into the two common iliac arteries (Figure 1.1). During its course through the abdominal cavity, and as its flow volume decreases, the diameter of the aorta diminishes quite rapidly, resulting in a tapering down of the vessel. The abdominal aorta has many branches, the most notable of which supply the gastro-intestinal tract (the coeliac trunk, superior and inferior mesenteric arteries) and the kidneys (the renal arteries). Definition In 1991, the Joint Councils of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the North American Chapter of the International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery defined an aneurysm as a “permanent localized (ie; focal) dilatation of an artery having at least a 50% increase in diameter compared to the expected normal diameter of the artery in question”. For this definition to be accurate in the case of an aortic aneurysm, it is important to know the normal diameter of the aorta. Aortic diameter varies with body size, sex and age, so clinicians can either measure the diameter of a normal section of aorta adjacent to the diseased area, or use previously published data to identify the expected normal aortic diameter for the patient in question. A group in North America reviewed CT scans of nearly 400 patients without aneurysmal disease and produced these results for the expected diameter (in millimetres) of the aorta at the level of the renal arteries according to the patients age, sex and body surface area (Pearce WH et al, 1993, Table 1.1). The Joint Councils of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the North American Chapter of the International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery also published these values for normal aortic diameter in their guidelines, from selected data in the literature (Table 1.2)
Supervisor: Sayers, Robert ; Bown, M.J. Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: MD Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.529629  DOI: Not available
Share: