Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.529408
Title: Three-dimensional visualisation and quantitative characterisation of fossil fuel flames using tomography and digital imaging techniques
Author: Guillermo, Gilabert-Garcia
Awarding Body: The University of Kent
Current Institution: University of Kent
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
This thesis describes the design, implementation and experimental evaluation of a prototype instrumentation system for the three-dimensional (3-D) visualisation and quantitative characterisation of fossil fuel flames. A review of methodologies and technologies for the 3-D visualisation and characterisatiOII of combustion flames is given, together with a discussion of main difficulties and technical requirements in their applications. A strategy incorporating optical sensing, digital image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques is proposed. The strategy was directed towards the reconstruction of 3-D models of a flame and the subsequent quantification of its 3-D geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters. Based on this strategy, a flame imaging system employing three identical synchronised RG B cameras has been developed. The three cameras, placed equidistantly and equiangular on a semicircle around the flame, captured six simultaneous images of the flame from six different directions. Dedicated computing algorithms, based on image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques have been developed to reconstruct the 3-D models of a flame. A set of geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters, including surface area, volume, length, circularity, luminosity and temperature are determined from the 3-D models generated. Systematic design and experimental evaluation of the system on a gas-fired combustion rig are reported. The accuracy, resolution and validation of the system were also evaluated using purpose-designed templates including a high precision laboratory ruler, a colour flat panel and a tungsten lamp. The results obtained from the experimental evaluation are presented and the relationship between the measured parameters and the corresponding operational conditions are quantified. Preliminary investigations were conducted on a coal-fired industry-scale combustion test facility. The multi-camera system was reconfigured to use only one camera due to the restrictions at the site facility. Therefore the property of rotational symmetry of the flame had to be assumed. Under such limited conditions, the imaging system proved to provide a good reconstruction of the internal structures and luminosity variations inside the This thesis describes the design, implementation and experimental evaluation of a prototype instrumentation system for the three-dimensional (3-D) visualisation and quantitative characterisation of fossil fuel flames. A review of methodologies and technologies for the 3-D visualisation and characterisatiOII of combustion flames is given, together with a discussion of main difficulties and technical requirements in their applications. A strategy incorporating optical sensing, digital image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques is proposed. The strategy was directed towards the reconstruction of 3-D models of a flame and the subsequent quantification of its 3-D geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters. Based on this strategy, a flame imaging system employing three identical synchronised RG B cameras has been developed. The three cameras, placed equidistantly and equiangular on a semicircle around the flame, captured six simultaneous images of the flame from six different directions. Dedicated computing algorithms, based on image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques have been developed to reconstruct the 3-D models of a flame. A set of geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters, including surface area, volume, length, circularity, luminosity and temperature are determined from the 3-D models generated. Systematic design and experimental evaluation of the system on a gas-fired combustion rig are reported. The accuracy, resolution and validation of the system were also evaluated using purpose-designed templates including a high precision laboratory ruler, a colour flat panel and a tungsten lamp. The results obtained from the experimental evaluation are presented and the relationship between the measured parameters and the corresponding operational conditions are quantified. Preliminary investigations were conducted on a coal-fired industry-scale combustion test facility. The multi-camera system was reconfigured to use only one camera due to the restrictions at the site facility. Therefore the property of rotational symmetry of the flame had to be assumed. Under such limited conditions, the imaging system proved to provide a good reconstruction of the internal structures and luminosity variations inside the This thesis describes the design, implementation and experimental evaluation of a prototype instrumentation system for the three-dimensional (3-D) visualisation and quantitative characterisation of fossil fuel flames. A review of methodologies and technologies for the 3-D visualisation and characterisatiOII of combustion flames is given, together with a discussion of main difficulties and technical requirements in their applications. A strategy incorporating optical sensing, digital image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques is proposed. The strategy was directed towards the reconstruction of 3-D models of a flame and the subsequent quantification of its 3-D geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters. Based on this strategy, a flame imaging system employing three identical synchronised RG B cameras has been developed. The three cameras, placed equidistantly and equiangular on a semicircle around the flame, captured six simultaneous images of the flame from six different directions. Dedicated computing algorithms, based on image processing and tomographic reconstruction techniques have been developed to reconstruct the 3-D models of a flame. A set of geometric, luminous and fluid dynamic parameters, including surface area, volume, length, circularity, luminosity and temperature are determined from the 3-D models generated. Systematic design and experimental evaluation of the system on a gas-fired combustion rig are reported. The accuracy, resolution and validation of the system were also evaluated using purpose-designed templates including a high precision laboratory ruler, a colour flat panel and a tungsten lamp. The results obtained from the experimental evaluation are presented and the relationship between the measured parameters and the corresponding operational conditions are quantified. Preliminary investigations were conducted on a coal-fired industry-scale combustion test facility. The multi-camera system was reconfigured to use only one camera due to the restrictions at the site facility. Therefore the property of rotational symmetry of the flame had to be assumed. Under such limited conditions, the imaging system proved to provide a good reconstruction of the internal structures and luminosity variations inside the flame. Suggestions for future development of the technology are also reported.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.529408  DOI: Not available
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