Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.525034
Title: Dental erosion in Libyan schoolchildren and its association with potential risk factors
Author: Huew, Rasmia
Awarding Body: Newcastle University
Current Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
Dental erosion appears to be affecting a growing number of children but there are no data on its prevalence and severity in children or adults in Libya. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental erosion in Libyan schoolchildren, compare with other countries and to test its association with potential risk factors and dental caries. A crosssectional observational study was carried out in Benghazi, Libya. Ethical approval and permissions were secured from local authorities and written consents obtained from parents/guardians and children. Cluster sampling within schools provided a random sample of 791 12 year-old schoolchildren, mean age 11.7 (SD± 0.31) years (397 boys and 394 girls) attending 36 elementary schools in 15 different districts in Benghazi. This index assesses the area and depth of dental erosion affecting the labial and palatal surfaces of upper permanent incisors and occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars. Dental caries was assessed using the DMFT and DMFS indices and WHO (1997) criteria. The reproducibility of the study was assessed through the re-examination of 10% of the sample. Associations between dental erosion and caries and the variables under study were investigated through processes of bivariate and multivariate analysis. The statistical significance level was set at 5%. Dental erosion was observed in 40.8% of subjects; erosion into enamel affecting 32.5%, into dentine affecting 8% and into pulp affecting 0.3% of subjects. The prevalence of dental caries was 57.8%. The mean DMFT and DMFS indices were 1.68 (SD± 1.86) and 2.39 (SD± 3.05) for all subjects and 2.90 (SD± 1.56) and 4.14 (SD± 2.97) for subjects with caries experience. Dental erosion was not statistically significantly associated with dental caries. Analysis of the questionnaire survey showed statistically significantly positive associations between the experience of dental erosion and frequency of consumption of fruit-based sugared drinks (p= 0.006) and time taken to consume drinks (p= 0.005) and a statistically significantly negative association between dental erosion and frequency of consumption of tea with milk (p= 0.032). There was a statistically significantly positive association between experience of dental caries and frequency of consumption of fruit-based sugared drinks (p= 0.002) and a statistically significantly negative association between dental caries and the level of fathers’ education (p= 0.015). No statistically significant associations were found between dental erosion or caries and any dietary variable measured through the food diaries with interviews. It is concluded that, the prevalence and severity of dental erosion in 12 year-old children in Benghazi, Libya was in agreement with data reported for the prevalence and severity of dental erosion in European children. The consumption of fruit-based sugared drinks represented the most important risk factor for dental erosion and caries in this sample of Libyan schoolchildren.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Libyan Government
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.525034  DOI: Not available
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