Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.523646
Title: The development and use of electronic business in the Chinese automotive supply chains
Author: Song, Mei Winnie
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
The Chinese auto sector has been developed under Government planning and control. In just one decade, the Country has become the largest marketplace in the global auto industry. Implementation of electronic business (EB) is essential for all global auto enterprises to succeed. For this reason, it is important to understand the development of EB within the Chinese automotive sector. The thesis is concerned with the implementation of electronic business within the Chinese automotive industry. It begins with a detailed study of the development of the Chinese automotive industry from 1953 to 2008 and highlights changes in the sedan (passenger vehicle) sector. This work has identified government control and planning as being the driving force making the sector the largest automotive market in the world. The thesis then focuses the need for and development of electronic business within the Chinese automotive sector. The work has identified how EB has been adopted and is being developed inside China. Information reported in the work was obtained in two ways, one by conventional literature studies, the other by interviews through personal contacts inside China. The research has shown that government strategies and industrial policies continue to be a major driver of the Chinese auto sector and as such cannot be ignored. The research suggests there has been no government policy to determine the choices of EB systems used inside China. It is shown that Chinese auto makers have followed the foreign partners' global experience and adopted their existing EB systems for use in Sino-Foreign joint ventures (JVs). This means some major Chinese automakers now operate multi-systems for their JVs.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.523646  DOI: Not available
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