Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.523012
Title: Entertainment noise control in Algeria
Author: Belayat, Nadia Bousseksou
Awarding Body: London Metropolitan University
Current Institution: London Metropolitan University
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
These last ten years, in Algeria noise pollution has become an environmental issue where people are exposed to unacceptable levels of noise. The main noise source is from traffic, from neighbourhood and domestic noise particularly {entertainment premises known as wedding halls}. Other significant sources of noise annoyance in Algeria include building construction and household noise as well as car alarms and even barking dogs. In this present study, my concern will be on one of the main noise source in Algeria which is noise from entertainment halls. In Algeria, there is no existing framework or enforceable code for noise control. In view of the absence of a proper noise control standard in Algeria, a large number of wedding halls have been built without any protection {insulation, double glazing ... } causing disturbance and annoyance in the neighbourhood. The noise from these wedding halls is badly affecting neighbours. Modern amplification and music styles make this an increasing problem. Therefore local people saw their lives disturbed by the noise caused by these kinds of recreational halls. As a result of the lack of standards, this study was conducted. A noise survey has never been previously attempted in Algeria. The aim of this survey is to establish noise level limits and measurements according to the WHO guidelines recommended to create the necessary set off regulations and guidelines on which we could rely in treating the different noise problems in Algeria. During my investigations in Algiers concerning this subject I have understood that all the entertainment premises I have visited in the centre of the capital and its suburbs have been working without applying any true ,clear regulations concerning noise in general . I have found out that unfortunately {for these premises neighbourhood} no serious standards or codes of practice have been written in Algeria for the purpose of giving guidance or an objective assessment methodology to assist officers investigating neighbour and neighbourhood noise when they happen to deal with noise complaints. Up to now the only body noise complainers could refer to solve their noise problem is the police who most of the time resolve to make the antagonists meet, to cut the matter short they usually order them to reach a mutual compromise and resolve the problem amicably. In fact, most of the wedding halls which have sprung up everywhere and everyday between 2000 and 2008 have opened up in centre of towns close to places of residence entailing extreme noise nuisance to the neighbourhood. The people affected by noise disturbance do not know who can settle their complaints, except of course, a legal action which of course involves a loss of time and money. The measurements show a considerable increase in the noise level when the 'weddings' are on. This would not prove acceptable in the UK. Arguments will need to be advanced as to the correct criteria to be used in the specific circumstances of Algeria and how they can be achieved using local materials and construction practices.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.523012  DOI: Not available
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