Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.517594
Title: The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition of anti-microbial thin-films and transparent conducting oxides
Author: Youngson, Paul
Awarding Body: University of Salford
Current Institution: University of Salford
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
Flame Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (FACVD) is an inexpensive and robust method of producing a wide range of metal and metal-oxide films. The work presented shows this method's ability to deposit durable, semi-transparent anti- microbial films which show large reductions in the number of colony forming units (99% in just 15 minutes, 100% in 60 minutes) of Escherichia Coli and Staphylococcus Aureus using just 55 ^mol silver per m2 of substrate. A further focus of this work is on the production of transparent conducting oxides. A series of experiments based on complex factorial design is presented which allows for the optimum properties of a conducting, transparent film of SnC>2 to be presented. Intrinsically doped indium oxide films with sheet resistance 250 Q per square, neodymium oxide films and zinc oxide films with preferential growth orientation have also been deposited. The ineffectiveness of FACVD to extrinsically dope metal oxide films was studied and the conclusion was reached that the gas-phase driven nature of the chemical reactions allows for preferential nucleation of one oxide over another. Finally, work is presented on the flow considerations of the FACVD process. A method is shown to achieve the optimum flow conditions for each particular precursor used and previous workers' theories are tested on the gas-phase breakdown of particulates and shown to be inadequate with a new theory of gas-phase flow being argued.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.517594  DOI: Not available
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