Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.516253
Title: Football fans, their information, the Web and the personal home page
Author: Narsesian, Shant
ISNI:       0000 0000 9028 8132
Awarding Body: City University London
Current Institution: City, University of London
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
From the early days of the Internet to the present day, the World Wide Web has developed into one of the world's largest information resources. One of the first genres of web pages, which was also one of the first information resources, was the Personal Home Page (PHP). Over this same period of time, professional football in England has created the world's richest league and by extension an abundance of football related PHPs. This study investigates the role of the PHP as an information resource using the subject area of professional football in England. A holistic approach is taken so as to view the PHP from a broader context, as one information resource amongst many, including non-PHPs and even offline information resources (e.g. reference books). Within this study, football fans are interviewed along with web authors, surveys are carried out (by distributing both online and offline questionnaires) and research is also carried out online, examining football related PHPs and online web collaborations. Results suggest that whilst there are many informational benefits to be found on PHPs, such as plentiful unique information, they have low levels of use amongst football fans. The thesis concludes by proposing an avenue to the maximisation of the informational benefit of PHPs through a blueprint for a type of communal football website called the Club Community Composite Page (CCCP). Overall, several contributions are made to the field of information science, most notably attaining an improved understanding of PHPs as unique and accurate information providers online and devising new research methods for PHP research. In particular, the method of identification of PHPs developed here will be a useful tool for future researchers of PHPs. The contributions of this thesis are likely to be of value to researchers working in relevant sub-fields of information science, such as information seeking, web genres, grey literature and virtual communities.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.516253  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Z665 Library Science. Information Science
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