Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.514938
Title: A multidisciplinary approach to the study of slope instability in Derbyshire, with particular reference to Matlock
Author: Dakin, Susan Helen
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 1989
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Abstract:
This study of slope instability in the Matlock region of Derbyshire uses, and tests the applicability of, a variety of techniques from reconnaissance through to site investigation. The aims have been to (i) provide a greater understanding of landsliding in this area and (ii) produce a critical assessment of the techniques employed. A procedure was developed for the application of Landsat-5 TM imagery to slope stability studies, however, such imagery was found to be of very limited use in the study area. Morphological and geomorphological mapping from aerial photographs and in the field proved to be of greatest use for supplying information on landslide location, morphology, type and recent activity, and also in identifying surface water conditions. These techniques are relatively rapid, require the minimum of equipment, and provide a large amount of relevant data in a short time. They are also applicable to both reconnaissance surveys and site investigations. The geomorphological survey of Oker Hill near Matlock revealed a large multiple rotational landslide. An ochre-precipitating spring is situated within this landslide. A similar spring occurs on Mam Tor landslide in north Derbyshire, and Vear (1981) has shown this to be evidence of pyrite oxidation of the shale, a process which is believed to lead to periodic slope failure. Analysis of core material from two boreholes through the Oker Hill landslide confirmed that pyrite has been lost from the failed material and that the present base of the weathered zone is in the pyritic shale. Pyrite oxidation is resulting in iron oxide staining, the loss of sulphur (presumably as sulphuric acid which will participate in further reactions) and in an overall deterioration of the rock quality of the shale.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.514938  DOI: Not available
Keywords: GB Physical geography
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