Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.512206
Title: Re-making conservation? : international conservation tourism and private wildlife ranching in South Africa
Author: Cousins, Jenny Abigail
Awarding Body: The University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This thesis is an 'alternative format thesis', and thus the body of this work takes the form of a number of research papers. Its fundamental achievement is to significantly develop our understanding of the characteristics, practices, role/ significance, challenges and regulation of two contemporary and innovate forms of ecotourism which have rapidly expanded in recent years. They are international conservation tourism and private wildlife ranching in South Africa. Although quite separate entities, these sectors have a great deal in common. Both commodify wildlife and wild places for sale. Both have become increasingly commercialised and profit driven enterprises. Both have rapidly evolved in a rather piecemeal or organic fashion ahead of government regulation, and both have the potential to contribute to biodiversity conservation, community development and public education. These two types of ecotourism are directly linked through the huge popularity of South Africa's private wildlife ranches as a destination for international conservation tourism holidays. The intense coupling of nature and society created by these two forms of tourism required an interdisciplinary approach and research methods combining both qualitative and quantitative techniques. This thesis takes a political ecology approach to show how historical factors, ways of viewing the environment and power relations are shaping this emerging form of conservation. The thesis concludes with an overview of the substantive findings and suggestions for future research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.512206  DOI: Not available
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