Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.511903
Title: Mexican journalism and democratic transition : clientelism in the Mexican media system
Author: Pena Corona Rodriguez, Monica Alejandra
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2010
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Abstract:
The defeat of the longstanding PRI party in the presidential elections of year 2000 has been acknowledged as a milestone in the democratisation of Mexico. Nevertheless, for over 40 years, many authors have suggested that Mexico has been undergoing a democratic transition. These repeated assertions highlight just how difficult it is to define a democratic transition or when or how such a process begins or ends. Media theorists have been intrigued as to what changes a media system goes through when experiencing a democratic transition, as new political arrangements have an impact on the dynamics of journalism and newsmaking. This study aimed to examine to what extent the close relationship that the media and the government traditionally held during the PRI regime had changed as a product of political transformations. This research adopted the concept of political clientelism of a media system as a theoretical framework, in order to identify aspects in which the Mexican media system had altered from how it occurred in the past. The study relied on the use of two types of qualitative research methodologies, interviews with Mexican journalists, as well as content analysis of newspaper articles. Through the examination of the ways in which Mexican journalists carry out their work as well as their role perceptions in regards to democracy on the one hand, and on the other through the evaluation of how coverage has differed over time, this thesis aims to contribute to the understanding of the way in which media systems in transition are studied. It argues that changes in media systems should be studied in relation to more routine journalistic practices, rather than on the assumption that changes in politics or on the apparent finance of the media unequivocally transform journalistic culture towards democratisation.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.511903  DOI: Not available
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