Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.511212
Title: Exploring the attitudes of health care professionals towards incident reporting within three NHS trusts : a mulit-method approach
Author: Giles, Sally J.
Awarding Body: The University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
ABSTRACT OF THESIS submitted by Sally J. Giles for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and entitled, "Exploring the attitudes of health care professionals towards incident reporting within three NHS trusts: a multi-method approach". August 2005 Adverse events are thought to occur in up to 16% of hospital admissions. As a result there has been a drive towards establishing incident reporting systems as a an error prevention tool. In health care these systems are typically based on those developed in other high-risk industries. However they are often subject to high levels of underreporting and therefore fail to establish the real causes of adverse events. Health care organisations aim to take a systems approach to analysing error, therefore creating a low-blame culture. However a number of inter-professional issues and a weak safety culture amongst health care professionals can prevent this from taking place. This study aimed to determine the attitudes of health care professionals towards incident reporting. In order to achieve this a multi-method approach using both qualitative interviews and a survey was employed in an attempt to triangulate the research findings. Twenty-eight health care professionals from the department of orthopaedics in three NHS trusts were interviewed and a survey developed from the interviewees was sent to all health care professionals in orthopaedics at the three NHS trusts. The findings from the survey complemented the qualitative data and were able to validate some of the findings. In spite of a drive towards establishing a safety culture within the NHS, there was still evidence of a weak safety culture and attitudes of health care professionals towards incident reporting were very negative. The thesis drew particular attention to the existence of subcultures within the NHS and how this may limit the use of the theories and concepts used in other high-risk industries.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.511212  DOI: Not available
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