Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.509438
Title: Brain Ictal State Characterisation through Multimodal Information Integration
Author: Bermudez, Thomas Antoine Raymond
Awarding Body: Aston University
Current Institution: Aston University
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This Thesis addresses the problem of automated false-positive free detection of epileptic events by the fusion of information extracted from simultaneously recorded electro-encephalographic (EEG) and the electrocardiographic (ECG) time-series. The approach relies on a biomedical case for the coupling of the Brain and Heart systems through the central autonomic network during temporal lobe epileptic events: neurovegetative manifestations associated with temporal lobe epileptic events consist of alterations to the cardiac rhythm. From a neurophysiological perspective, epileptic episodes are characterised by a loss of complexity of the state of the brain. The description of arrhythmias, from a probabilistic perspective, observed during temporal lobe epileptic events and the description of the complexity of the state of the brain, from an information theory perspective, are integrated in a fusion-of-information framework towards temporal lobe epileptic seizure detection. The main contributions of the Thesis include the introduction of a biomedical case for the coupling of the Brain and Heart systems during temporal lobe epileptic seizures, partially reported in the clinical literature; the investigation of measures for the characterisation of ictal events from the EEG time series towards their integration in a fusion-of-knowledge framework; the probabilistic description of arrhythmias observed during temporal lobe epileptic events towards their integration in a fusion-of-knowledge framework; and the investigation of the different levels of the fusion-of-information architecture at which to perform the combination of information extracted from the EEG and ECG time-series. The performance of the method designed in the Thesis for the false-positive free automated detection of epileptic events achieved a false-positives rate of zero on the dataset of long-term recordings used in the Thesis.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.509438  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Computer Science
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