Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.508871
Title: Theoretical and visual appraisal of behavioural symptoms of the Asperger's Child
Author: Wright, Robert
Awarding Body: University of Portsmouth
Current Institution: University of Portsmouth
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This thesis explores how we as neurotypicals, people who have normal neurological development, might re-perceive every-day tasks and objectives, when faced with a neurodiverse perspective that can contradict neurotypical developments. The term neurodiversity mostly appears within the online autistic community. How Autistic Spectrum Children are able to avoid, deal with or utilise alternative strategies for communication and development is visualised through a series of practical projects. The visualisation of difference informs theoretical and scientific material through narrative illustration. Narration is here considered part of the ubiquitous component of human communication. The ability to process linguistic information and social cueing is observed through verbal communication, body language and social and formal interaction between each other. This prompts reaction, tolerance and an appropriation of cueing and reciprocation. Neurodiversity is, as in any typical neurological development, a human difference that should be tolerated and respected as any other human difference. Acceptance of difference is key to the topics and issues held in the practical work produced in this submission. Semiotic meaning is used in the practical works as part of a general communicative discourse, combining image, codes, signs and symbols that exhibit different modalities that are presented to and decoded by the viewer. Visualy based enquiry allows investigation into the communication difficulties between the Asperger's children and the people that surround them, namely parents, siblings, family members, friends and school associates including staff and peers. The practical projects visualise the difference in the behaviour of the Asperger's child where non-appropriate responses to stimuli are presented. Interviews, meetings and questionnaires present case studies with anonymity; clinical support and parental experiences inform visual developments. This project contributes to the visualisation of scientific data where imaging encourages understanding with the subject. The role of the body of practice submitted is also considered from the perspective of developing and informing pedagogic practice, in parallel with strengthening a personal practitioner base. In all, fourteen projects are reported on, each is disseminated via a website attached to the Portsmouth University Illustration Course website - www. envf. port. ac. uk/illustration/ under my staff name Bob Wright and also at - www. thoughtism. co. uk The simplification of the complexities in multiaxial diagnosis strategies, were a starting point for the project. Medical assessment of ASD children can further confirm any parental suspicions. These parental observations and the important relation and or bearing upon diagnosis are a key issue I have raised in some of the projects.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.508871  DOI: Not available
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