Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.502506
Title: Deliberate self-harm in mental health inpatient settings
Author: Payne, Hannah Austin
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
Deliberate self-harm is a significant phenomenon amongst people in the general community, and is particularly prevalent amongst patients being treated in mental health inpatient settings. Views that staff hold towards patients who self-harm could have an impact upon the care and interventions that are delivered. The focus of this thesis was deliberate self-harm within inpatient mental health settings. The literature review presented in Chapter I provides an overview of previous reviews of studies that have evaluated psychological interventions for deliberate self-harm. All recent relevant evaluative studies of psychological interventions predominantly aimed at reducing deliberate self-harm, or treating self-harm as part of the symptomatology of Borderline Personality Disorder, arnongst inpatient enviromnents are then critically reviewed. The results of this are discussed along with clinical implications for practitioners working in mental health inpatient settings and recommendations for future research. The focus moves to staff attributions towards deliberate self-hann in inpatient settings in Chapter 2. This chapter presents empirical findings, reporting on adaptations of attributional and knowledge measures, and analyses of responses to these measures provided by qualified and unqualified nursing staff participants working in an inpatient setting. Questions regarding training needs were also posed, and participants were given the opportunity to comment on working with people who self-harm. Chapter 3 presents a reflective paper, incorporating references from literature, poetry and music, providing reflections on producing the first two chapters of the thesis, and on the overall experience of completing research for the clinical psychology doctorate course.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psy.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.502506  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry ; BF Psychology
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