Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.502236
Title: Influences on community nurse prescribing
Author: Hall, Jason
Awarding Body: The University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The aim of this PhD was to investigate the factors that affect community nurse prescribing decision-making. Findings: Nurses placed great importance upon factors affecting patient satisfaction and compliance. District nurses felt they had sufficient time to discuss prescribing with patients whilst health visitors felt the time available in their clinics was not conducive to prescribing. The risks that nurses associated with a product affected their prescribing such that they were happy to initiate a 'low risk' product but would prefer a GP to initiate a 'high risk' product. There is an abundance of pharmacological information to support prescribers but most of this is aimed at medical prescribers and therefore was not in a format that was accessible for nurse prescribers. Assessing and influencing the quality and cost effectiveness of prescribing by community nurses and providing them with feedback on their performance did not appear to be a priority for PCTs. Barriers with the potential to reduce the impact of nurse prescribing on patient care were identified and some of these barriers were more significant in some localities compared to others. The selection of products by community nurse prescribers was largely influenced by their mentor during their training as a district nurse and subsequently modified for some nurses by representatives from the pharmaceutical industry, colleagues in their team and their own experience. Prescribing data helped to identify research questions when prescribing was compared across professional boundaries but the differences in case mix between different professions meant it was not a suitable research tool when used in isolation from other methods.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.502236  DOI: Not available
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