Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.501490
Title: Assessing a threat to sustainable NTFP harvest using ecological data and traditional ecological knowledge
Author: Rist, Lucy
Awarding Body: Imperial College London
Current Institution: Imperial College London
Date of Award: 2009
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
Sustainable harvesting of non-timber forest products (NTFPs) and associated livelihood security can be compromised by changes in the broader ecosystem. This study investigates mistletoe infection of Amla, Phyllanthus emblica and Phyllanthus indofische7i, an NTFP of significant livelihood importance, in the Biligiri Rangaswarny Temple (BRT) Wildlife Sanctuary in southern India. Infection patterns of the Loranthaceae mistletoe, Taxillus tomentosus, were characterised across the Amla population and their underlying mechanisms explored. Two alternative management approaches were investigated, and traditional ecological knowledge documented and assessedfo r its concordance and additionality to scientific data. A high prevalence of infection, and the apparent greater susceptibility of the more significant resource species, suggests that mistletoe infection has serious implications for Amla sustainability. Traditional knowledge provided novel information on infection spread, and highlighted failings in current population assessments, emphasising the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to assessing sustainability. Traditional approaches to management conflict with current institutional perspectives, but may be somewhat more effective and require further investigation. However, existing data, both from scientific studies and traditional knowledge, are insufficient to prescribe with certainty the best approach to mistletoe control. The participatory implementation of an active adaptive management programme may offer benefits over alternative management options for securing Amla as a viable NTFP harvesting system.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.501490  DOI: Not available
Share: