Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.500350
Title: The concept of 'bodily injury' under the Montreal Convention 1999
Author: Naboush, Eman
Awarding Body: Glasgow Caledonian University
Current Institution: Glasgow Caledonian University
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
A perennial problem in applying international conventions is terminology - especially where consistency of application is important in preserving the uniformity of intemational law. Not only is the meaning of the words an issue, especially where there is an authentic version in more than one official language, but also those words must be given meaning within the jurisdiction where they are to be applied. In jurisdictions without a common law background, (the English version is one of six authentic versions), the temi would include psychiatric disorder or mental injury. In common law jurisdictions, most prominently English law the term 'bodily injury' is not used elsewhere than in these conventions, although it appears in insurance policies. The sue of protecting the consumer is a key issue under Montreal Convention. The theme of this thesis is to predict the future interpretation of the Montreal's term 'bodily injury' in the light of the spirit of the twenty-first century and the existing medical and legal sciences at the time of agreeing the Montreal Convention should include both physical and mental injuries.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.500350  DOI: Not available
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