Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.499567
Title: Healthy, wealthy and wise? : working past age 65 in the UK and USA
Author: Lain, David
Awarding Body: Sussex University
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This thesis provides a comparative analysis of employment past age 65 in the UK and USA in the early 2000s, using large-scale government surveys from both countries. In the USA we argue a 'policy logic' of 'self-reliance' was dominant, under which people were expected to time their retirement according to their financial needs. In the UK, on the other hand, a policy logic of 'paternalism' was evident, which assumed that individuals would retire at or before age 65. In the first empirical chapter we examine how demand for labour interacts with policy to shape the job opportunities open to people in their sixties. In the next two chapters we examine whether the poor in the USA were more likely to work past 65 than the poor in the UK, because of the dominant policy logic of self-reliance in the USA. First, we examine this with reference to marital status and gender, to see if female widows and divorcees, the poorest marital-status groups in both countries, were more likely to work past 65 in the USA than in the UK. Second, we examine the question in relation to wealth, rather than income, and incorporate the influences of health and education into the analysis - as low levels of health and education are likely to act as barriers to employment for the poorest. In the concluding chapter we argue that although moving towards a self-reliance policy logic in the UK would increase employment amongst those aged 65 and over, it would do less to benefit the poorest who have the greatest financial need to work, but are prevented from working by low qualifications and bad health.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.499567  DOI: Not available
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