Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.498764
Title: Exploring the effects of the electronic patient record on hospital pharmacy personnel using a case study approach
Author: Smith, G. M.
Awarding Body: University of Manchester
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The aim of this programme of work was to explore the effects of EPRs on hospital pharmacy personnel. A multiple case study approach was used, with research carried out at four acute NHS hospital Trusts in England, at varying stages of developing and implementing their EPR systems. Within the Trusts studied, a mixture of paper and electronic prescribing systems were in use. Paper-based prescribing systems were found to be well developed to support communication and coordination of medicines supply and clinical pharmacy activities. The electronic prescribing systems supported these activities to varying degrees. This 'fit' with working practices was an important factor in whether a system had been accepted by personnel, and highlighted the importance of a good understanding of work practices in successful system design. In the paper and electronic prescribing systems, pharmacists were able to modify prescribed therapies, usually to optimise patient care and safety. Here, both systems fitted with the aspirations of the profession for an expanding clinical role, influence on prescribing, and a contribution to enhanced patient safety in the use of medicines. If EPR systems are seen to contain a representation of the activities of healthcare professionals, then they go some way to formalise pharmacists' role in this particular activity. They may also be a tool to prompt further debate as to the roles of professional groups in hospital prescribing processes in the future. Important safety issues for EPR systems were highlighted; the potential for EPRs to both reduce certain types of error, and allow or facilitate the occurrence of others was identified in the systems studied.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.498764  DOI: Not available
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