Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.497712
Title: An exploration of perceived risk in young Chinese consumers' Internet banking services decision making
Author: Zhao, Anita Lifen
Awarding Body: University of Gloucestershire
Current Institution: University of Gloucestershire
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
This thesis explores how perceived risk, which has been primarily developed in Western contexts, may help understand consumers' action in relation to the Chinese Internet banking services market. This market is new and acknowledged as having great potential, but there is insufficient information regarding potential consumers and their perceptions or decision-making. The theory of perceived risk is a key construct influencing Western consumers' decision making; whether it is applicable in the current context is unknown. A wider customer perspective is therefore important to improve both our understanding of perceived risk theory and its usefulness in the Chinese Internet banking services market. The thesis reviews the major research perspectives on perceived risk within consumer behaviour literature. It provides a comprehensive understanding of the concept itself, to identify research gaps, and also develops a research model to evaluate consumers' risk perception within the context of Chinese Internet banking services. This research is conducted through the application of a critical realist approach, utilizing mixed methods. This approach enables the research to address a main controversy in the perceived risk field by evaluating the two common measurement models. It also develops an understanding of Chinese consumers' risk perceptions and how consumers' perceptions are formed and influenced by considering a range of contextual issues. This approach highlights the importance of obtaining social and cultural meanings to understand the measurement of risk perception- this is seldom addressed in the majority of perceived risk research. Results are thoroughly analysed, compared and contrasted to relevant Western research. Perceived risk, as a construct, is meaningful in helping to understand potential Chinese Internet banking services users. The principle risk dimensions identified in this research are consistent with those detailed in Western studies. However, the underlying relationships between the risk variables are different. Such differences can be attributed to the specific The measurement of risk is best operationalised through the application of one of the commonly used models - the multiplicative. This model produces results that are more consistent with the qualitative patterns derived from the application of mixed methods research. Whilst this research advocates the use of the multiplicative model, it also contends that future researchers should evaluate both common models- as the impact of context needs to be addressed sensitively,and this would also be consistent with the application of a critical realist perspective. Further, when considering perceived risk measurement, this research has found that the application of multiple variables is useful to test validity and reliability. These two issues are seldom considered or evaluated in previous perceived risk studies. This application also lends itself to the development of greater depth in data analysis, and therefore provides a more specific perspective to understand risk perceptions through detailed measurement. Future research in perceived risk should also address risk evaluation by considering the purchase stages, as consumers risk perceptions may be influenced and subject to change at different stages. Without such an approach results generated may be misleading, and may not provide an adequate basis for understanding consumers and developing appropriate marketing strategies to meet these concerns.
Supervisor: Hanmer-Lloyd, Stuart ; Ward, Philippa Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.497712  DOI: Not available
Keywords: HG1501 Banking
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