Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.495052
Title: Human embryonic stem cells : prospects for pancreatic β-cell differentiation
Author: Shah, Nadia Nisa
Awarding Body: UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER
Current Institution: University of Manchester
Date of Award: 2008
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Abstract:
The focus of this thesis was to explore different strategies in trying to generate putative pancreatic β-cells using one of the initial Wisconsin H7 hES cell lines. Prior to this, human pancreas development was assessed during the first trimester of pregnancy in an attempt to determine the spatial and temporal expression of development and mature pancreatic β-cell markers during this period. Spontaneous differentiation of hES cells can be induced by the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) in suspension culture. EBs began to express markers of pancreatic β-cell development and function at a molecular, protein and functional level upon differentiation over a 3-week period. The constitutive over-expression of the terminal β-cell marker PAX4 enhances this process, whereas karyotypic abnormalities induced in hES cells over prolonged culture can hinder differentiation potential towards pancreatic β-cells. Directed differentiation strategies which mimic mouse pancreas development have led to the elucidation of an in vitro protocol to generate putative definitive endoderm from hES cells through the application of Wnt3a and Activin A in the presence of low serum. Indirect co-culture of this H7 hES cell-derived putative definitive endoderm with mouse islets did not lead to the differentiation of fully functional pancreatic β-cells. The hES cell-derived putative definitive endoderm did however influence the aging mouse islets in a positive manner by allowing the maintenance of insulin secretagogue-induced functional responses which are usually lost in culture. This may prove useful in maintaining viability of human islets during culture to be used for transportation therapies.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.495052  DOI: Not available
Share: